2016-11-03 / Breaking News / Front Page / Local News

Measure L to fund schools appears to have overwhelmingly passed

Greg Little, editor

Charlotte Kelsey (maintenance, operations, transportation, facilities and warehouse manager for the district), Robin Hopper (superintendent for MCUSD) and Vicki Bustos (executive secretary to superintendent) smile for the camera after learning about the success of Measure L.Photo by Matt JohnsonCharlotte Kelsey (maintenance, operations, transportation, facilities and warehouse manager for the district), Robin Hopper (superintendent for MCUSD) and Vicki Bustos (executive secretary to superintendent) smile for the camera after learning about the success of Measure L.Photo by Matt JohnsonIt looks like Mariposa County voters have overwhelmingly chosen to fund school facilities improvements.

When the mail-in ballots were counted on Tuesday night, Measure L, the $24 million bond targeted at school facilities improvements, was overwhelmingly ahead in the count.

As of 8:30 p.m., Measure L had 3,375 votes in favor and just 1,437 against. That is a 70 percent in favor and 30 percent against.

Though the returns from Tuesday’s vote are still incomplete, all indications are the measure will pass as early voting is the dominant way people in Mariposa County cast ballots.

“I want to thank the entire community and all of our supporters,” said Superintendent Robin Hopper, who has been on a blitz around the County trying to sell the measure to voters.

“This will make such a big difference for our students and our schools,” said Hopper. 

Hopper said she has been “praying and hoping” the bond would pass.

“I felt all along it was going to pass,” said Hopper.

“We have been trying to raise the standard,” said Hopper.

The next step in the process is for the district to form a citizens advisory group to oversee the funding.

In addition, more funding could be coming, depending on the outcome of the statewide election where a $9 billion measure is on the ballot to improve school facilities.

With 15 percent reporting on Tuesday night, that measure, Proposition 51, was passing 52-48. There were, however, many more votes to be counted.

Hopper said no matter the outcome, the school district will focus on the local bond and begin the process of determining the facilities improvements that need to be done. A priority list will be established, she said.


Other races

In the race for the John C. Fremont Hospital District Board, early indications are that at least two newcomers will win seats on the board.

Dr. Joseph Rogers was by far the largest vote-getter among those who voted by mail. Rogers had 2,557 votes. Sally Uribe had 2,074 votes and Philip DeBry had 1,599.

Ever-so-close was incumbent Suzette Prue with 1,553 votes. Troy Foster had 1,470 and David Butler had 1,154.

There are three open seats on the board. It is likely the final determination of the three winners will not be made until all of the votes are counted, which was expected to be around 11 p.m. or later, according to election officials.

In the race for Mariposa County United School District board, challenger Jim Cupp had a narrow lead over incumbent Steven Bacus in the race for District 2. Cupp had 2,077 votes compared to 1,980 for Bacus. That race, too, will likely be decided after the final votes are counted from the voting that took place on Tuesday.

We’ll have the final election votes online on Wednesday morning and in this week’s edition of the newspaper.

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